Cora L. Herrington née Bond

I bought these two photos on an Instagram sale from the United States. One of them seems to have been kept in a round photo frame all these years. And the other one is a copy from a newspaper article.  

Cora L. Bond was the oldest child of W. Irwin Bond (1832–1892) and Mary née Smith (1833–1882), born on September 2nd, 1853. Irwin was a farmer in Geauga County, Ohio. In 1870, when Cora was 16, she was working as a teacher in the common school. Her sister Mina was 10 and Adella (Della) 7 years old. 

On September 10th, 1872, Cora married Charles Seth Herrington in Geauga. Charles was a farmer and a Civil War veteran. In 1880, they were living in Russell, Geauga and Charles had taken up cheese manufacturing. By 1880, Cora and Charles had 3 children: daughters Carrie May and Alice, and son Luman. In 1884, their youngest daughter Emma Olive was born. 

Cora was 63 when she passed away on July 15, 1917, in Chardon, Ohio. Charles followed in March 1921. They were both buried at the Maple Hill Cemetery, Munson, Geauga.

Cora’s sister Mina Herrington (1861-1918) married Clifford Ernest Walker in 1880 and they had three children. Cora’s baby sister Della Herrington (1863-1918) married Henry Carlton Wilber in 1881, and she also had three children. Very strange that all three sisters died within one year from each other…

Now a few words about Cora’s children. Their descendants might be out there, missing these photos of their ancestor.

Cora’s daughter Clarice “Clara” May Herrington had been born on January 14th, 1874. She married Bion Burns Hazen on January 12, 1905, in Geauga, Ohio. Clara and Bion’s wedding was reported on in detail in the New Philadelphia, of Ohio, on January 12th, 1905:

The 1910 Census does not list any children for Clara May and Bion. In 1920, Clara May was unfortunately widowed. She moved in with her brother Luman’s family and was living with them in 1930. Clara May passed away in 1956. 

Cora’s son Luman Herrington was born on May 15th, 1876. He became a farmer in Munson, Geauga, like his father. He was a late bloomer and only got married in his late 30s. By 1930, he and his wife Ada N. had 3 children. Daughter Cora Delle was born in the same year that Luman’s mother Cora passed away – what a sweet gesture to name his daughter after his late mum! By 1940, Cora Delle had become a teacher, just like her granny Cora had been at her age. Luman’s sons Lloyd and Willard were a couple of years younger.  Luman passed away in 1949. 

Cora’s daughter Alice L. Herrington was born on February 17th, 1882, and unfortunately passed away in 1901, at just 19 years of age. She was not married at the time.

Emma Olive Herrington was the youngest daughter of Cora and Charles Herrington. She was born on April 16th, 1884. She married Lee James Hunt, a barber, on February 17, 1903. They had 8 children: Harold Lee Hunt (1903-1987), Lawrence David Hunt (1905-1913), James Irving Hunt (1908-1980), Pauline Adeline Hunt (1912-1979), Arline Frances Hunt (1914-2006), Everett Walter Hunt (1918-1983), Ola Mae Hunt Kingman (1922-1990) and Mary Jane Hunt (1926-2006). In 1920, they were living in Bainbridge, Geauga, Ohio, and James had become a farmer. Emma passed away in 1944, and James in 1959. 

Looks like Emma’s husband James and his brother-in-law Luman Herrington might have been good chums. In 1939, they visited a corn-husking contest near Delaware, Ohio together. I don’t know anything about corn-husking, but looks like the contests are still held today.

I wish I knew what Cora was like as a woman, mother and grandmother. I also wish I knew from which newspaper the second photo is from! Unfortunately, I haven’t found anything on her on newspapers.com. It would be so interesting to read the clip that was published together with her photo!

I’ve added her photo to FamilySearch.org. Please reach out to me if you’re related to Cora Bond Herrington! 

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s